Kitchen Matters

How To Smoothie

Balance in the composition of smoothie is less important than other meals, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a consideration. A fully sweet and tropical combo of coconut milk, banana, and pineapple is balanced wonderfully by crunchy cacao nibs. The deeply satisfying and detoxifying effects of kale, parsley, and spinach are punched up with lemon and cayenne. Peaches, honey, ginger, and spinach combine to hit an array of different notes. And of course, from a health standpoint, it’s a good idea to integrate one of each of the groups for a nutritious breakfast or snack. In other words, considering balance in a smoothie is what takes it from good to great. 

On a more instructional note, blend your leafy greens and liquid first. You’ll have a much better chance for full integration. Then add fruits and seeds. Save the chia for the end; if they get blended, they lend a very gelatinous texture to the drink. The suggested ratio for the chart on the facing page is equal parts greens and liquid with the addition of the desired amount of fruit.

by Christie Little

STORING FRUIT & VEG

Fruits, vegetables, and herbs last a whole lot longer when they’re stored properly. In this chart, foods are grouped based on temperature, humidity, and air flow needed for maximum freshness. Try reusable containers whenever possible, but in some cases plastic bags just work the best (you can wash them out and air-dry for multiple uses). In place of paper towels, washable flour sack linens are an ideal way to maintain moisture levels. Always remove rotten food items from the bunch; it’s no myth one bad apple will take down the crowd. And make the effort to buy loose, instead of pre-packaged foods—it’s more affordable and sustainable. When root vegetables have greens attached, remove greens at the base before storing or the greens will continue to zap nutrients and water from the product you’re going to consume. Most veggie greens are perfectly delicious and should be stored separately just as any other green. Speaking of! For greens, use a salad spinner to clean and thorough dry before storing for quick and easy salads.

Did I miss anything? Please

Kitchen Matters is a series of poster-style graphics and illustrations designed to improve life in the kitchen, from planning and shopping to chopping, cooking, and breaking bread. They aim to take the stress out of the entire cooking experience by creating room for connecting to food and the people with whom it’s shared.

by Christie Little

SETTING THE TABLE

Remembering how to set the table has always been something that I pretend is on my to-do list, but never really makes it there. Despite my penchant for a dinner party and the amount of time I spend in restaurants, it's never actually permeated by brain on which side my fork should land. For everyone in the same boat, here's a quick rundown: 

When setting the table for an informal meal, there are really only a couple of hard and fast rules. Once you’ve got the basics down, simply add utensils for each element of the meal.

  • Forks to the left of the plate, knives and spoons to the right.
  • Knife blades always face the plate.
  • Napkins are to the left of the fork or on the plate.
  • Glasses to the top right.

    When the vibe starts heading in a more formal direction, there are couple of extra bits to keep in mind.
     
  • Stop at three of one utensil on the table, with the exception of an oyster fork in addition to three other forks. (I know... who has that many forks?)
  • When three or more courses are served before dessert, the fourth course utensils arrive with the fourth course plates. This also goes for dessert and, optionally, the salad course.
  • Utensil placement goes chronologically with each course from the outside to the inside. (First course goes furthest from the plate on either side.)
  • Water goblet goes directly above the knives and all glasses should top out at 5. (I knooooow, who has that many glasses??)

Kitchen Matters is a series of poster-style graphics and illustrations designed to improve life in the kitchen, from planning and shopping to chopping, cooking, and breaking bread. They aim to take the stress out of the entire cooking experience by creating room for connecting to food and the people with whom it’s shared.

by Christie Little